On Our Grounds

Labyrinth & Healing Gardens

A labyrinth is a sacred symbol that can be traced back in history some 3,000 years to ancient labyrinthGreece. It is a spiritual tool and signifies different things for different people. Each time you walk the labyrinth, you will undoubtedly find something new in the experience.

In the Middle Ages, interest in labyrinths increased. The most famous one remaining today is located at Chartres Cathedral, near Paris, France. Our labyrinth is a variation on its design. For Christians, labyrinths served to symbolize the path toward redemption, both in everyday life and on pilgrimage to sacred destinations.

Unlike a maze, labyrinths have one path. While mazes are designed to confuse and confound with their many turns and dead ends, a labyrinth offers one path into its center and then retraces the path back into the world. At St. Paul’s we know that Center to be God, in Jesus Christ.

There is no right or wrong way to approach the path. You may use the labyrinth in many ways.  Come with your care, concerns, thoughts, and joys, and experience it in whatever way you like.  The labyrinth is open daily, sunrise to sunset.


Cemetery

St. Paul’s grounds are home to an historic churchyard where you’ll find examples of cemetery architecture from early colonial times through the 18th and 19th centuries.  While burial of coffins is no longer permitted, we do have an area dedicated as an in-ground columbarium.

 

 

 

 


9/11 Memorial

Found immediately to the left at the entrance to our grounds, the 9/11 Memorial at St. Paul’s was dedicated on September 11, 2011, the ten-year anniversary of the attacks.

The memorial is constructed from a piece of metal salvaged from the ruins of the World Trade Center in New York City. It serves as a reminder that, ultimately, love will conquer fear and hate.


The Chittim-Howell House

The Chittim-Howell House — the white house to the left of the Church — is home to our Parish and Staff offices and the ARTWorks Gallery on the Green.

Inside our Church

 

St Paul’s Virtual Tour Courtesy of Elizabeth Gentile, Evergreen Studios.

 No photo description available.